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Archive for the ‘vegetable shortening’ Category

This icing is meant to go with Chocolate Cake.

The recipe uses hydrogenated vegetable shortening, under the Spry brand name. I’ve commented on the history, use and health considerations of using Spry or its competitor brand, Crisco in an earlier posting. My personal choice would be to use butter, which would probably also give a better taste.

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This is the filling that goes with Chocolate Cake, but you could use it with other cake recipes too.

This recipe uses hydrogenated vegetable shortening, under the Spry brand name. I’ve commented on the history, use and health considerations of using Spry or its competitor brand, Crisco in an earlier posting. My personal choice would be to use butter, which would probably also give a better taste.

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This is a straightforward cake recipe using the creaming method. You might want to refer to the tips on creaming here and here.

Instead of butter, this recipe uses hydrogenated vegetable shortening, under the Spry brand name. I’ve commented on the history, use and health considerations of using Spry or its competitor brand, Crisco in an earlier posting. My personal choice would be to use butter, which would probably also give a better taste.

For the filling and icing, please see:
Chocolate/Coffee Filling
Chocolate Water Icing

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Another recipe of grandmother’s that used Spry vegetable shortening (which I’ve commented on here, in addition to comments on Spry’s equivalent, Crisco, here), which was very much the method of cooking at the time. You can substitute with butter.

See grandma’s list of oven temperatures to find out the correct setting for a moderately hot oven.

This Baked Chocolate Pudding is unique because it has a meringue topping, very similar to these other recipes I’ve found on the internet here and here.

Baked Chocolate Pudding

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For the crust, try out one of the shortcrust pastry recipes I posted earlier:
Crisco Pastry
Shortcrust Pastry

In those pastry recipes, I’d commented on Crisco and Spry, which are hydrogenated vegetable fats, and Spry is also one of the ingredients for the lemon curd here. Spry can be substituted here with butter, which probably also gives a better taste.

Cooking the curd in a pan of simmering boiling water rather than over direct heat helps to prevent the eggs from curdling. Read more about this technique and tips on making lemon curd here. If curdling does happen, the lemon curd will have to be strained, so this alternative recipe suggests a way to avoid the problem (including a fascinating scientific explanation) as well as more tips for getting a successful lemon curd.

Lemon Curd Tart

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I posted grandma’s Crisco shortcrust pastry recipe earlier. This one uses another vegetable shortening, Spry, which was Crisco’s main competitor. Read more of my earlier comments on these vegetable shortenings also here.

The recipe’s list of ingredients states ‘butter’ next to ‘Spry’, though the ingredients refer only to Spry. As I noted in the Crisco pastry recipe, grandma taught me to make shortcrust pastry with ‘half butter, half Crisco’, so similarly, in this recipe, grandmother might have meant to use a combination of butter and Spry.

This pastry can be used as the pie shell for the many pie recipes in grandma’s notebook.

Shortcrust pastry

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As you can tell from the other recipes on this blog, my grandmother was not a purist when it came to food and she took to modern innovations and convenience foods very happily.

One of the convenience foods which was a regular presence in the home when I was growing up in the 1980s was American frozen waffles. When I ate them, grandma would tell me about the ‘old days’ when she had to make her own waffles with a waffle iron. This recipe is written proof of those homemade waffles.

In recent months, I bought an electric waffle iron (sadly, too late for grandma to enjoy hot, homemade waffles once again). I wonder how different the apparatus in the 1960s compared to the ones we have today?
Waffles

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